The Beacon

Blog Tags: Bycatch

Deep Sea Sharks in Northeast Atlantic Still at Risk from Overexploitation, Warns Group

Deep sea sharks are over-exploited in Northeast Atlantic waters

Angular rough shark (Oxynotus centrina), a deep-sea shark species pictured off Spain. (Photo: Oceana)

The International Council for the Exploration of the Sea (ICES), a network of over 4,000 scientists, warn that sharks in deep waters in the Northeast Atlantic continue to face a bleak future. ICES provided recommendations for three deep-sea shark species—kite fin sharks, leafscale gulper sharks, and Portguese dogfish sharks—and advise that these sharks should not be involved in fishery activities.


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Oceana Takes Action to Reduce Wasted Catch in East Coast Gillnet Fisheries

Ocean submitted a letter to reduce gillnet bycatch

An illegal Moroccan drift gillnet boat hauls in a sea turtle. (Photo: Oceana / Jesus Renedo)

Last month, Oceana submitted a proposal aimed at reducing the amount of wasted catch in New England and Mid-Atlantic gillnet fisheries, which throw away 16 percent of their total catch every year. The Northeast gillnet fisheries were identified in Oceana’s Wasted Catch report as one of the nine most wasteful fisheries in the United States as a result of their bycatch.


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Oceana Magazine: Wasted Catch

Oceana's Wasted Catch report outlined the dirtiest fisheries for bycatch

A loggerhead turtle (Caretta caretta) caught on a longline. (Photo: Oceana / Mar Mas)

Earlier this year, Oceana released a new report, “Wasted Catch,” that looked at the dirtiest fisheries in the United States for bycatch, and found that some U.S. fisheries discard more than half of everything they catch. This feature takes a close look at these fisheries and other issues surrounding bycatch.


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Conservation Groups Plan Lawsuit to Protect Sperm Whales

California Swordfish Drift Gillnet Fishery threatens sperm whales

“Mother and baby sperm whale." (Photo: Gabriel Barathieu, Wikimedia Commons) 

Earlier this month, several conservation groups, including Oceana, announced plans to file a lawsuit against the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) to protect sperm whales from deadly, mile-long drift gillnets used in the California drift gillnet fishery.


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Poll Update: Great White Sharks Win as the Fan Favorite (Photos)

Great white sharks receive negative media attention

A great white shark (Carcharodon carcharias). (Photo: "White shark" by Pterantula (Terry Goss) at en.wikipedia - Derivative of w:Image:Whiteshark-TGoss5b.jpg. Licensed under Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 via Wikimedia Commons) 

In honor of Shark Week, we asked our audience on Tuesday to weigh in on their favorite shark species. Not surprisingly, great white sharks turned out to be the fan favorite!


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Dusky’s Big Adventure, Day 5: Dusky Asks for Help to Complete His Bucket List

Dusky asks for help completing his Bucket List

Dusky asks for help completing his Bucket List. (Photo: Oceana)

This is the last post in a five-part blog series that features Dusky the Shark. This week, Dusky appeared in a comic strip that explains why dusky sharks in the northwestern Atlantic are at risk, and what actions he and Oceana are taking to protect his species. Take a look below to see how Dusky the Shark has developed his plan to save his species this past week.


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Bycatch Spotlight: One of the Biggest Issues Facing Sharks Today

Bycatch is a leading killer of sharks

A dusky shark hooked on a long line. (Photo: NOAA Fisheries)

In honor of Shark Week, Oceana is taking a look at one of the biggest issues facing sharks today: bycatch, or the unintentional catch of non-target fish and other marine life. It occurs in multiple fishing gear types and occurs in fisheries throughout the world. Fortunately, this is a reversible situation that can be overcome with collaboration between fishermen and policy makers.


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Video: Meet Some of the Most Famous Satellite Tagged Sharks

satellite tags help scientists learn more about sharks

Dr. Neil Hammerschlag, Dominique Lazzare, and Curt Slonim from the University of Miami measuring a Caribbean reef shark (Carcharhinus perezi) before tagging it onboard the Lat-Long shark tagging operation. (Photo: Oceana / Carlos Minguell)

From whales to sea turtles and caribou, both terrestrial and marine animals are satellite-tagged around the world. Satellite tags—radio transmitters that submit signals to orbiting satellites—are an effective way to study animal behavior, including foraging and migration patterns.


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Dusky’s Big Adventure, Day 4: Dusky Creates “Dusky’s Bucket List” to Save His Species

Dusky creates “Dusky’s Bucket List” to save his species.

Dusky creates “Dusky’s Bucket List” to save his species. (Photo: Oceana)

This is the fourth post in a five-part blog series that features Dusky the Shark. This week, Dusky is appearing in a comic strip that explains why dusky sharks in the northwestern Atlantic are at risk, and what actions he and Oceana are taking to protect his species.


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Infographic: Here’s Why Dusky Sharks Need to Get off the Hook

Dusky shark populations have declined by 99 percent

A dusky shark (Carcharhinus obscurus). (Photo: Richard Ling / Flickr Creative Commons)

Dusky sharks, a bronze-blue colored species found in warm coastal and open ocean waters, are in trouble. Populations in the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico have plummeted by 99 percent over the past 40 years as a result of overfishing and bycatch — the capture of non-target fish and ocean wildlife.


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